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Nikola Ellis

Nikola Ellis is the founder of Adore Yoga, yoga therapist, counsellor and teacher trainer. She conducts regular trainings that help people of all ages, shapes and abilities enjoy the benefits of yoga and meditation, including Meditation Facilitator Certificate Trainings; Level 1 200hr Teacher Training and Post Graduate Yoga Teacher Training in Mental Health, Adaptive Asana and the Foundations of Yoga Therapy and a highly regarded professional 650hr Graduate Certificate of Yoga Therapy.
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Recent Posts

04 Aug
Posted by Nikola Ellis

Teaching yoga to elderly students

I was SO EXCITED this week to share a Facebook Live conversation with a wonderful yoga therapist who specialises in working with elderly students. If you work with older students or want to know how to approach teaching frail and elderly people, read on - you'll want to know what Nana Chresta has to say (plus there's a FREE 'yoga for older adults' class plan for you!)

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28 Jul
Posted by Nikola Ellis

Teaching pranayama to students with anxiety? Read this now.

 

Are you teaching pranayama to students with anxiety? Stop! There may be a better way to help them.

 

Learning how to breathe deeply and smoothly will help people with anxiety, right? Not necessarily. For many anxious students, focusing on the breath triggers more anxiety. On paper, teaching pranayama to your shallow-breathing, anxious students seems to make sense. But for some students, it can be unbearable. I know, because I was that student freaking out during a pranayama session.

 

I have long history of anxiety and panic attacks. It's what brought me to yoga in the first place. When I first heard about pranayama, I decided it was just what I needed. It made perfect sense - regulating the breath would calm my nervous system and prevent anxiety. But that's not how it worked in practice...

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21 Jul
Posted by Nikola Ellis

Why ALL your students will benefit from trauma sensitive yoga

 

"Trauma sensitive yoga is for people with PTSD? Why do I need to learn it if I'm teaching regular classes?"

 

That's a good question. But who is attending your 'regular' yoga classes? Do traumatised people only show up in yoga classes designed especially for them? Do people who are affected by trauma but don't meet the clinical threshold for PTSD benefit from trauma sensitive yoga?

 

And what if ALL of your students benefited from trauma sensitive yoga?

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14 Jul
Posted by Nikola Ellis

Three ways Ayurveda makes planning your yoga classes easy

Do you spend a lot of time coming up with class plans? 

Do you struggle to find new and exciting themes for your yoga classes? 

Here are three reasons why Ayurveda has the answer to your class planning prayers (PLUS your free Ayurveda and Meditation & Mantra cheat sheet!):

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12 Jul
Posted by Nikola Ellis

Ayurveda and Yoga Therapy

Ayurveda is useful for every teacher, but it's essential for yoga therapists. All the Adore Yoga Therapy courses include significant Ayurveda components, building skills that our graduates use to support students to heal from physical, mental and emotional health issues. 

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30 Jun
Posted by Nikola Ellis

How to teach chanting

You love chanting in a group.

You're curious about the benefits of chanting.

You'd love to share the joy of chanting with your students.

You just don't feel very confident or knowledgable.

 

If the statements above sound familiar to you, you're going to love the free mini e-course I've made for you.

 

Your step by step guide to teaching chanting. 

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23 Jun
Posted by Nikola Ellis

A moving meditation that changes everything

Struggling to focus during meditation? Perhaps your students are reluctant to sit for more than a minute or two in meditation? Adding movement to meditation is a game-changer. Try this practice (or share it with your students) and see how the experience of meditation is transformed. 

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08 Jun
Posted by Nikola Ellis

Black lives matter - Yoga and justice

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02 Jun
Posted by Nikola Ellis

COVID-19 and your un-yogic thoughts

 

Has COVID-19 brought up strong and unpleasant feelings for you? Here are some things I've heard from yoga teachers recently:

 "I'm so stressed about money because I've lost so many of my classes in recent months. It feels really un-yogic to think about money all the time."

“The anger I'm feeling about this situation is so corrosive. It keeps bubbling up and I hate myself for it.”

“I know I'm supposed to live in the present moment, but I'm constantly worrying about my future as a yoga teacher."

 

At the heart of these statements lies the conviction that feeling stressed, worried or angry  is a bad thing. It’s un-yogic. Where did so many of us get that idea? How did we come to believe that being a yoga teacher means vanquishing all feelings except that elusive ‘bliss’ state that only Instagram yogis seem to master?

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25 May
Posted by Nikola Ellis

When a student has a negative reaction to your teaching

This is my 'I can't believe this is happening to me on a live group Zoom call' face: 

 

Has a student ever told you that the practice you just taught made them feel terrible? 

 

It just happened to me.

 

This morning, I was delivering a live online tutorial for the Adore Online Meditation Teacher Training program. I was joined by 28 wonderful students from all around Australia, plus a few calling in from overseas. 

 

I taught the group a simple breathing technique, inviting them to gently extend their exhalation a little. At the end, one student exclaimed how wonderful she felt. Another said it had cured her headache. But one student had a very different reaction.

 

In the middle of a live online tutorial, this student made it clear that the practice had made her feel lousy. She said she'd felt a tonne of resistance and was now feeling agitated. That wasn't part of the plan.

 

So how did I respond? Well, we were recording the tutorial so you can find out for yourself. Moments before this clip starts, a student on this call told everybody that the practice I'd just taught had made her feel bad. Here's what I said:

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